Petersen Family Farm - Riverton, UT


Local attraction featuring pick your own pumpkins starting in late September. They also have a harvest festival in October with free admission, a live band, free hot dogs, petting zoo, corn maze, and fee paid concessions, tractor rides, apple sling shot, and lots of fresh apples, pears, and pumpkins. The address is 11887 South 4000 West, Riverton, UT 84096. They are 21 miles south of Salt Lake City.


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Petersen Family Farm updated their cover photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Beautiful!

7 days ago
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Really?!! 🍅 They're ready?!!!!!!

7 days ago

2 Replies

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Sharon Brand

4 days ago   ·  1
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Its spring, and the fields are turning green. I was talking to a customer the other day about how the farm looks in late summer versus how it looks in winter. There was a sense of surprise, almost, that the fields in winter are bare.

I dont know of many other business models that require you to build your whole business, literally from the ground up, every year.

That period of rest is crucial, though. Without periodic breaks, the plants leach all of the nutrients out of the soil, leaving it lifeless. In order to have all of what we have in June, we have to have some bare fields in January.

Where else do we need those periods of rest, those cyclical spaces where the soil is bare? Maybe when were transitioning, from one state of being to another, from one place to another, from one life path to another. We cant just jump from thing to thing, from season to season, without pauses. Or - we can, but we sacrifice something. We sacrifice depth of roots for quick growth.

Are you growing, now? Are you resting? Or are you waiting to find out?

It's spring, and the fields are turning green. I was talking to a customer the other day about how the farm looks in late summer versus how it looks in winter. There was a sense of surprise, almost, that the fields in winter are bare.

I don't know of many other business models that require you to build your whole business, literally from the ground up, every year.

That period of rest is crucial, though. Without periodic breaks, the plants leach all of the nutrients out of the soil, leaving it lifeless. In order to have all of what we have in June, we have to have some bare fields in January.

Where else do we need those periods of rest, those cyclical spaces where the soil is bare? Maybe when we're transitioning, from one state of being to another, from one place to another, from one life path to another. We can't just jump from thing to thing, from season to season, without pauses. Or - we can, but we sacrifice something. We sacrifice depth of roots for quick growth.

Are you growing, now? Are you resting? Or are you waiting to find out?
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Doing some resting and growing!

2 weeks ago

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With how wet its been this spring, the days that are dry enough to work have been a frenzy of activity: getting the tractors hooked up, fueled, and ready to go the night before, and then starting work as early as we can tolerate, pushing hard until dusk.

Its exhausting. Its exhilarating.

When were out in the fields, I cant help thinking about the people who did this before me. They didnt have hourly weather forecasts, telling them the rain would stop at noon. They didnt know when they were clear of the last frost days in advance. They didnt have GPS guiding tractors that can till fields into buttery softness in seconds. When a piece of equipment broke down, they couldnt hop into town in a few minutes to grab a replacement part.

At the same time, though, were not so far removed as we might think.

I feel so amazingly lucky, to be doing this work, with this group of people, in this space and in this time. Because even with all the advancements, even with 500 horsepower of tractors, really were doing something ancient and simple. Were a group of humans, banding together for survival and community. In that way, no matter what we do and how we do it, were continuing something thats always been.

With how wet it's been this spring, the days that are dry enough to work have been a frenzy of activity: getting the tractors hooked up, fueled, and ready to go the night before, and then starting work as early as we can tolerate, pushing hard until dusk.

It's exhausting. It's exhilarating.

When we're out in the fields, I can't help thinking about the people who did this before me. They didn't have hourly weather forecasts, telling them the rain would stop at noon. They didn't know when they were clear of the last frost days in advance. They didn't have GPS guiding tractors that can till fields into buttery softness in seconds. When a piece of equipment broke down, they couldn't hop into town in a few minutes to grab a replacement part.

At the same time, though, we're not so far removed as we might think.

I feel so amazingly lucky, to be doing this work, with this group of people, in this space and in this time. Because even with all the advancements, even with 500 horsepower of tractors, really we're doing something ancient and simple. We're a group of humans, banding together for survival and community. In that way, no matter what we do and how we do it, we're continuing something that's always been.
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You are doing such great and important work. But then, you were always a hard worker. I love reading your posts.

2 months ago   ·  1

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You have a great crew! But then, they have a great boss! Love 💕 the farm!

2 months ago   ·  1

3 Replies

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I absolutely Love this picture ‼️✨

2 months ago   ·  1

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